CfP: Preconference of the Communication History Division of the International Communication Association, “Reconsidering Empires and Imperialisms in Media and Communication History,” Paris, May 25, 2022.

A bilingual pre-conference (English & French) sponsored by the Communication History Division, International Communication Association.

Organizers: Jade Montané (Agence France-Presse and Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines), François Robinet (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines), and Dominique Trudel (Audencia Business School)

Propositions are due January 15, 2022.

CfP: Post-Truth and Affective Publics’ Challenges to Social Ties. Disinformation, Populism, Data-Driven Propaganda

CALL FOR EXTENDED ABSTRACTS: ICA PRECONFERENCE 2022 Metz, France

Endorsed by the following ICA divisions: Journalism Studies, Political Communication. Deadline for Extended Abstracts: January 31, 2022, 23:59 GMT

THEME

The recent global resurgence of populism, most notably in countries with strong democratic traditions, has brought the issue of politics’ relationship to truth to the forefront of academic debates, firmly entrenching the notion that we have now entered an era of post-truth. As they effectively harness the affordances of unregulated social platforms and the potential of personal data commodification to advance their political agendas, populist leaders across the globe also exploit both the systemic flaws of media systems and the conditions that predispose part of the citizenry to believe in alternative narratives regardless of their factual accuracy. This preconference examines how the interplay between such dynamics severely challenges social ties and enables populism around the world.

The acceleration of innovation in communication technology and the increasing commodification of personal data have combined with the already hyper-segmented offer of legacy media to throw news media ecologies across the globe in a state of flux. Through selective exposure, users are provided with infinite opportunities to reinforce their pre- existing attitudes and engage with the political process affectively, a phenomenon further compounded by new challenges to journalistic authority that accelerate already existing trends and shake traditional informational hierarchies to their cores. The resulting audience polarization in turn jeopardizes the possibility of a common citizenship, as users are effectively barred from cultivating shared patterns of representation of the social world.

Read more in the call for papers

Authors should submit an extended abstract of 1000-1500 words to: crem-ica-preconference-2022-metz-contact@univ-lorraine.fr
by January 31, 2022.

Organizer Center for Research on Mediations (CREM), Université de Lorraine

Steering committee François Allard-Huber, Nicolas Hubé, Angeliki Monnier, Sebastien Mort, Jacques Walter, Sandrine D’Alimonte

Sponsorship This preconference has received endorsements from the ICA Journalism Studies Division, the ICA Political Communication Division, the European Journalism Training Association (EJTA), the French Society of Information and Communication Sciences (SFSIC), as well as the Association for the Study of Journalism (GIS Journalism, France).This preconference is made possible in part thanks to the generous support from the French National Research Agency (ANR, project M-Phasis) and the European Commission (Erasmus+ project Fact-checking and Media Literacy)

Call for Papers – ECREA Communication History Section Workshop, Luxembourg 2022

A ECREA Communication History Section Workshop, co-sponsored by the ICA Communication History Division

History of Digital Media and Digital Media Historiography

2-4 February 2022, Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C2DH), University of Luxembourg 

The digital turn has had a transformative effect on all media, and it has also influenced the way in which media and communication history is shaped, written and disseminated. 

First, it has had an impact in terms of devices, distribution, production and content, as well as access and participation. Looking at these changes with the lenses of history is beneficial, because it helps contextualizing “revolutions” and continuities with the past. Consequently, the history of digital media can be seen as a new label for media histories related to digital politics, economics, technologies and cultures shaped by digitalisation. But it also deals with analogue media which have been digitised or have resisted digitisation is a new and relevant field. 

But at the same time, the digital turn is also affecting the shaping of media and communication history in various ways. It has changed the way in which media historians work at several levels, from access to sources and the creation of corpora based on digitised press outlets to audiovisual databases and web archives containing online press coverage, social media posts, tweets from journalists, etc. Moreover, the impact can also be seen in the tools scholars use to research and write media history, which often now rely on computational methods (network analysis, sentiment analysis, text mining, etc.) or new forms of storytelling. 

For this workshop, the ECREA Communication History Section is therefore calling for scholarly presentations that shed light on changes and continuities in the process of digitalisation, both now and in the past, or that explore historical practices, with the aim of providing a new perspective on media and communication studies and historiography in the digital age. 

The goal is to improve our understanding of the transition to digital technologies in various media (e.g. computerisation in media devices, digital production and practices, hybrid broadcasting or online switching), the overlaps between analogue and digital and the various issues raised by this transition, and the challenges, patterns, adaptations and controversies that have emerged during the process. 

The legacies of analogue and past models in current digital practices are also crucial if we are to understand the media response to the emergence of digitalisation. Proposals that explore the co-shaping of technological, economic and cultural changes and their influence on media professions, users and audiences are also very welcome. 

The way in which these changes have affected and transformed the work of media and communication historians is also a central theme of the workshop. We will also explore the way in which media and communication historiography has adapted, integrated, questioned and analysed media history in recent decades as a result of digital technologies, whether digitised or born-digital sources, databases, the “data deluge”, computational methods and new digital narratives. The workshop therefore aims to assemble a broad portfolio of perspectives on the topic covering a variety of historical periods, national or supranational settings and media stakeholders. We are interested in research that addresses the full scope of media and communication history from the advent of printing to the digital age.

Continue reading

Call for paper – Communication Maintenance in Longue Durée. A paper-based workshop

In the last decades, more and more scholars have claimed for an inclusion of maintenance among the key topics and key questions of technology (Edgerton 2007, Jackson 2014, Russell and Vinsel 2018, Henke and Sims 2020,). Communication and media studies have just partially included in their methodological and analytical tools reflections on maintenance (see Balbi and Leggero 2020; Weber and Krebs 2021) and this paper-based workshop aims to advance in this aspect adding another fundamental yet underestimated layer in communication and maintenance research: the longue durée.

Maintenance of communication infrastructures, for example, is a long-term process lasting for decades or even centuries. On the one hand, roads, networks and cables are constantly maintained to keep them functioning but, on the other, to understand their strategic relevance is important to adopt a longue durée perspective (Braudel 1958), since those channels of communication have often political, economic, and socio-cultural relevance. Sometimes, maintenance has a strong effect not only in preserving communication infrastructures, but also in modifying or even dismantling them. In long terms, communications can be radically changed because of maintenance and transformed into something totally different from what was originally to be maintained. 

Continue reading